Online Therapy and Counselling | JS Psychotherapy
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Online Therapy and Counselling

As a psychotherapist, I have had an increasing demand for psychotherapy online. For one reason or another, many people are finding that online therapy is the therapy of choice or need.

Online therapy is especially valuable for people who:

  • are housebound, whether through illness,
  • have carer responsibilities,
  • or are busy home makers are juggling the increased demands of modern life – work, family life, travel
  • are living in rural areas with limited public transport or who would have a long commute to get to my practice
  • are travellers for work or pleasure

Online therapy is also the therapy of choice for many, including Generation Y-ers, the internet “natives” who are born into a world that is connected online. So why not get therapy online?

There are many benefits to getting your therapy online.

Convenience – You can log in for your session wherever you can find a quiet space, be that at work, in your hotel room or at home. This is key for people who live in rural areas or in places where transport is limited, where simply logging on from home for a session can be a lifeline.

Continuity – If you travel a lot for work or pleasure, online therapy allows you to maintain the continuity of your weekly therapy sessions without the disruption of lots of breaks.

Time Saved – Time is a precious commodity. By removing the need to travel to your session, you get to “bank” the time and use it for the things that you need to while still having your session.

Choose your therapist – with online therapy you are no longer limited to working with a therapist just because they are close by. So if you are based in rural India you can work with me in my London based practice because you want to. The added advantage is that if you have to relocate for business or personal reasons, you still get to maintain your relationship and work with me.

Getting started with online therapy

To get started with online therapy, you can simply call, text, or email me. Once we agree a session time and day, I will invite you to call me at the time using VSEE, an app that is easily downloaded onto your smartphone, tablet or computer. (VSEE is a more reliable and secure video chat platform than others I have used.) Its a simple as that.

If you have any questions about online therapy, please do call or email me. I will be happy to speak to you.

To get started, you can call me on 020 7300 7243, or click here to email me to schedule an appointment in a safe and confidential setting.

2 Comments
  • Kat marlow
    Posted at 08:22h, 11 December

    I think that online counselling has its place and yet I worry that it encourages a generation who already seem to struggle with connecting on a physical basis to do so even less at a time when in reality that is probably part of the problem. I have also cone in to contact with many people who have been offered online CBT as the de facto therapeutic solution and have found it deeply unhelpful because what they really wanted was to be able to talk things through with a real person – worst case, it not working for them has just reinforced that they are broken and can’t be fixed and they have given up. Research seems to suggest time and again that what really makes the difference is the therapeutic relationship and wet need to ensure that in online therapy wee deliver this first and foremost!

  • Jacqueline
    Posted at 09:30h, 13 December

    Your comments are valid and I agree with them but online therapy also gives clients access to more therapists in the quest to find that “good fit” therapeutic relationship. It also provides access to therapy for people who otherwise might struggle, for example housebound or “time-poor” people, or for those who move around a lot, or for people who live in remote places with under developed transport links and can’t maintain a weekly in person session.